In 2005 we were commissioned by Japanese development company, Mitsui Fudosan, to produce a masterplan and garden designs for a new residential complex on the outskirts of Tokyo.

The new apartment buildings are within a park converted from old playing fields, which were previously the site of an arboretum with links to the Royal Horticultural Society. Consequently there were many mature and remarkable trees protected by preservation orders to consider and include within the design.

Our approach to this flattened piece of land was to look to the surrounding countryside, and propose a gently undulating topography to be applied to the site to create visual interest, a variety of perspectives in the landscape and a sense of intimacy on the open site.

The existing woodland, which includes swathes of flowering Japanese cherry, were brought right up to the new buildings, to soften the architecture and give residents the feeling that they are living in the woods.

Within the spaces created between the buildings we created a series of distinct courtyard gardens inspired by traditional Japanese gardens and landscapes: a Floating Garden of decks and boardwalks above expanses of water and low level marginal plantings; a Boulder Garden, inspired by glacial erratic deposits, with dynamic ribbons of graphic planting; a Meadow Garden with massed grasses and perennials; a Spring-flowering Orchard Garden, which connects to the existing cherries, and a Forest Garden for Autumn colour, which connects to the existing mature specimen trees and woodland.

Images © Dan Pearson Studio

 

Hamadayama
2006 - ongoing
Client: Mitsui Fudosan Building Co.
7 hectares

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